For June, I'm focusing on the Upper West Side (UWS), one of New York's most in-demand places to live, which means that prices there tend to be pretty inelastic. But New York's real estate market has been challenging in the last year as a major correction has been taking place in most sectors. By January of this year, even the UWS was beginning to show signs of stress, with homes staying on the market for longer, prices beginning to inch their way downwards and inventory expanding. And from what I'm seeing, that trend is still under way, at least as far as co-ops are concerned. Condos are a different animal and the substantial influx of properties into the market is throwing off those numbers a lot. For now, speaking only of UWS co-ops, the average selling price (all sizes) in May 2019 was 78% of the average price for all sales in June 2018.  Days on market are up 8% for the same time period. To narrow the field a bit, if we take only 2-bedroom co-ops for the same time period, selling prices in May were down 7% from last June and days on market were up 18%. Sellers are still eager to get the best value for their property but if they've been in the market for a while, they may be ready to make a deal. For buyers, this represents real opportunity, especially with mortgage interest rates continuing to sink to unprecedented levels! 
So, honestly, now, is there anyone who doesn’t love the Upper West Side? As I’ve mentioned before, when I dragged my husband kicking and screaming to Westchester twenty years ago, he left his finger nails buried in the wall of Zabar’s. Even though we don’t live there now, I would say we visit at least a couple times a week for opera, a movie, dinner, or for Michael’s requisite pilgrimage to buy coffee or smoked fish.  
Like everywhere else in New York, the UWS’s charm and appeal is all about its scale: spanning the distance from top to toe of Central Park (110th to 59th Street, or vice versa) and from Central Park to the Hudson River, this area sports wide north/south boulevards with grand Beaux Arts and Art Deco apartment buildings, traversed by tree-lined east/west streets of stoop-fronted townhouses.  I particularly love the ones that seem to predominate in the 70s over towards Riverside Drive built in the Dutch aesthetic with the crow-stepped gables. 
Many people compare the UWS with Paris’ Left Bank. There’s a slightly slower pace on the streets, lined with sidewalk cafes and great shops that are just too attractive and fun to hurry by. And, of course, there’s the culture, from Lincoln Center to the Beacon Theater to the Museum of Natural History and the New York Historical Society, to Symphony Space. 
What is now this popular, mostly residential area was a rural expanse of farms, estates and villages until well after the Civil War. Harsenville, from 68th to 81st Street, was a settlement of small farms around the property of Jacob Harsen and his wife the former Cornelia Dyckman. Strycker’s Bay consisted of land owned by Gerrit Striker and John McVickar essentially between 86th to 97th Streets. North of Strycker’s Bay lay Bloomingdale (Bloemendael) Village, a name which had applied to most of the West Side from Greenwich Village north since the 17th century Dutch period, but which by the end of the 19th century  only comprised the area from the upper 90’s to 110th Street. The name was cemented with the construction of the Bloomingdale Asylum (later the site of Columbia University) in 1820.  The north/south artery traversing this territory was the Bloomingdale Road which came to be known as The Boulevard in 1868 and ultimately Broadway around the turn of the 20th century. 
By the completion of Central Park (a twenty-year project which will get its own coverage here one of these days) and the establishment of Riverside Park and Riverside Drive in the 1870’s (like Central Park, also Olmsted/Vaux designs), landowners began selling off parcels to developers, especially along the green swaths to the East and West. By 1879, the 9th Avenue (Columbus Ave.) elevated was running all the way to 125th Street. The Dakota, considered very far north and west by New York’s then residential standards, rose at the corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West between 1880 and 1884. Directly across the street to the south was Jacob Rothschild’s Hotel Majestic. Like many so-called “hotels” of the era, the Majestic had suites and single rooms, some furnished, some not, that “could be rented by the year or on a more transient basis.”  Amenities included dining facilities offering American or European plans, an orchestra playing nightly in the conservatory, and bowling alleys. (Elegant New York, 1985, p.227) 
The following years saw the continued development of the Upper West Side as a residential area for the middle classes as the city’s first true subway line (as opposed to elevated) -- the IRT Broadway/7th Avenue -- arrived, and other buildings that have long been icons of the Upper West Side were built – the Ansonia (2107 Broadway), the Apthorp (390 West End Avenue), the Dorilton  (171 West 71st Street), and in the years leading up to the Great Depression, The Beresford (211 Central Park West), the San Remo (145 Central Park West), the Century (25 Central Park West), the El Dorado (300 Central Park West), and The Majestic which replaced its namesake hotel in 1931. Serving these grand residences along the Park and points farther uptown, the 8th Avenue IND subway line opened in 1932. 
In the meantime, the area around what is now Lincoln Center was known as San Juan Hill, a predominantly African American neighborhood of densely populated tenements. Was the fact that Thelonious Monk was a resident beginning in 1922 a harbinger of the neighborhood’s future status as a cultural hub? Alas, probably not. It was dubbed Lincoln Square as early as 1908 and by the 1940’s was targeted for the urban renewal which ultimately came about late in that decade and through the 50’s and 60’s. 
Lincoln Center rose in its place and in the 57 years since the opening of Philharmonic Hall in 1962 (later Avery Fisher and now David Geffen Hall), Lincoln Square has become one of the most sought after places in the city to live, dine, shop, be entertained, be educated. 
If the luxury apartment buildings of the Gilded Age offered amenities like orchestras and bowling alleys, today’s new condos are out to smash all records for living the indulged life. Residents of Waterline Square on five acres of sculpted park land on the Hudson will have access to 100,000 sf of “sports, leisure and lifestyle amenities” that include tennis, squash, soccer, swimming and rock climbing facilities, to name a few, plus studios for art, music, gardening and entertaining, and world renowned gourmet dining and shopping.  
But even if you’re not looking to live that large, there are opportunities to buy at many levels, from a junior one-bedroom on West 64th Street within steps to Central Park and Lincoln Center for under $350K or a high floor pre-war co-op studio on 75th Street near Riverside Drive for under $380K. If you need a little more space, you can look out on trees and Central Park from your two-bedroom co-op on upper Central Park West for under $900K. Or if outdoor space and a view are your must-haves, how about a beautifully renovated one-bedroom with a chef’s kitchen and a wrap terrace overlooking the Hudson from Riverside Drive in the low 100’s for under $1 million? The possibilities are endless from modest and homey to grand and glamorous. Or just visit! Grab some Thai at Thai 72, pizza at Sirenetta, gelato at Amorino, or go whole hog and pamper yourself at Lincoln. Catch a flick at Lincoln Square, AMC 84th Street, the Film Society of Lincoln Center or at the newly reincarnated New Plaza Cinema. Channel your inner Tuscan at a sidewalk café while people-gazing over an espresso or amaro. You don’t even have to live there to love the Upper West Side (but let me know if you decide to look!)  
 
Thanks to John Tauranac and his Elegant New York; Wikipedia.org (make a gift when you can!); and 6SqFt.com for all the history.  
  
COUNTRY GIRL IN THE CITY
MANHATTAN  |  JUNE, 2019
For June, I'm focusing on the Upper West Side (UWS), one of New York's most in-demand places to live, which means that prices there tend to be pretty inelastic. But New York's real estate market has been challenging in the last year as a major correction has been taking place in most sectors. By January of this year, even the UWS was beginning to show signs of stress, with homes staying on the market for longer, prices beginning to inch their way downwards and inventory expanding. And from what I'm seeing, that trend is still under way, at least as far as co-ops are concerned. Condos are a different animal and the substantial influx of properties into the market is throwing off those numbers a lot. For now, speaking only of UWS co-ops, the average selling price (all sizes) in May 2019 was 78% of the average price for all sales in June 2018.  Days on market are up 8% for the same time period. To narrow the field a bit, if we take only 2-bedroom co-ops for the same time period, selling prices in May were down 7% from last June and days on market were up 18%. Sellers are still eager to get the best value for their property but if they've been in the market for a while, they may be ready to make a deal. For buyers, this represents real opportunity, especially with mortgage interest rates continuing to sink to unprecedented levels! 
So, honestly, now, is there anyone who doesn’t love the Upper West Side? As I’ve mentioned before, when I dragged my husband kicking and screaming to Westchester twenty years ago, he left his finger nails buried in the wall of Zabar’s. Even though we don’t live there now, I would say we visit at least a couple times a week for opera, a movie, dinner, or for Michael’s requisite pilgrimage to buy coffee or smoked fish.  
Like everywhere else in New York, the UWS’s charm and appeal is all about its scale: spanning the distance from top to toe of Central Park (110th to 59th Street, or vice versa) and from Central Park to the Hudson River, this area sports wide north/south boulevards with grand Beaux Arts and Art Deco apartment buildings, traversed by tree-lined east/west streets of stoop-fronted townhouses.  I particularly love the ones that seem to predominate in the 70s over towards Riverside Drive built in the Dutch aesthetic with the crow-stepped gables. 
Many people compare the UWS with Paris’ Left Bank. There’s a slightly slower pace on the streets, lined with sidewalk cafes and great shops that are just too attractive and fun to hurry by. And, of course, there’s the culture, from Lincoln Center to the Beacon Theater to the Museum of Natural History and the New York Historical Society, to Symphony Space. 
What is now this popular, mostly residential area was a rural expanse of farms, estates and villages until well after the Civil War. Harsenville, from 68th to 81st Street, was a settlement of small farms around the property of Jacob Harsen and his wife the former Cornelia Dyckman. Strycker’s Bay consisted of land owned by Gerrit Striker and John McVickar essentially between 86th to 97th Streets. North of Strycker’s Bay lay Bloomingdale (Bloemendael) Village, a name which had applied to most of the West Side from Greenwich Village north since the 17th century Dutch period, but which by the end of the 19th century  only comprised the area from the upper 90’s to 110th Street. The name was cemented with the construction of the Bloomingdale Asylum (later the site of Columbia University) in 1820.  The north/south artery traversing this territory was the Bloomingdale Road which came to be known as The Boulevard in 1868 and ultimately Broadway around the turn of the 20th century. 
By the completion of Central Park (a twenty-year project which will get its own coverage here one of these days) and the establishment of Riverside Park and Riverside Drive in the 1870’s (like Central Park, also Olmsted/Vaux designs), landowners began selling off parcels to developers, especially along the green swaths to the East and West. By 1879, the 9th Avenue (Columbus Ave.) elevated was running all the way to 125th Street. The Dakota, considered very far north and west by New York’s then residential standards, rose at the corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West between 1880 and 1884. Directly across the street to the south was Jacob Rothschild’s Hotel Majestic. Like many so-called “hotels” of the era, the Majestic had suites and single rooms, some furnished, some not, that “could be rented by the year or on a more transient basis.”  Amenities included dining facilities offering American or European plans, an orchestra playing nightly in the conservatory, and bowling alleys. (Elegant New York, 1985, p.227) 
The following years saw the continued development of the Upper West Side as a residential area for the middle classes as the city’s first true subway line (as opposed to elevated) -- the IRT Broadway/7th Avenue -- arrived, and other buildings that have long been icons of the Upper West Side were built – the Ansonia (2107 Broadway), the Apthorp (390 West End Avenue), the Dorilton  (171 West 71st Street), and in the years leading up to the Great Depression, The Beresford (211 Central Park West), the San Remo (145 Central Park West), the Century (25 Central Park West), the El Dorado (300 Central Park West), and The Majestic which replaced its namesake hotel in 1931. Serving these grand residences along the Park and points farther uptown, the 8th Avenue IND subway line opened in 1932. 
In the meantime, the area around what is now Lincoln Center was known as San Juan Hill, a predominantly African American neighborhood of densely populated tenements. Was the fact that Thelonious Monk was a resident beginning in 1922 a harbinger of the neighborhood’s future status as a cultural hub? Alas, probably not. It was dubbed Lincoln Square as early as 1908 and by the 1940’s was targeted for the urban renewal which ultimately came about late in that decade and through the 50’s and 60’s. 
Lincoln Center rose in its place and in the 57 years since the opening of Philharmonic Hall in 1962 (later Avery Fisher and now David Geffen Hall), Lincoln Square has become one of the most sought after places in the city to live, dine, shop, be entertained, be educated. 
If the luxury apartment buildings of the Gilded Age offered amenities like orchestras and bowling alleys, today’s new condos are out to smash all records for living the indulged life. Residents of Waterline Square on five acres of sculpted park land on the Hudson will have access to 100,000 sf of “sports, leisure and lifestyle amenities” that include tennis, squash, soccer, swimming and rock climbing facilities, to name a few, plus studios for art, music, gardening and entertaining, and world renowned gourmet dining and shopping.  
But even if you’re not looking to live that large, there are opportunities to buy at many levels, from a junior one-bedroom on West 64th Street within steps to Central Park and Lincoln Center for under $350K or a high floor pre-war co-op studio on 75th Street near Riverside Drive for under $380K. If you need a little more space, you can look out on trees and Central Park from your two-bedroom co-op on upper Central Park West for under $900K. Or if outdoor space and a view are your must-haves, how about a beautifully renovated one-bedroom with a chef’s kitchen and a wrap terrace overlooking the Hudson from Riverside Drive in the low 100’s for under $1 million? The possibilities are endless from modest and homey to grand and glamorous. Or just visit! Grab some Thai at Thai 72, pizza at Sirenetta, gelato at Amorino, or go whole hog and pamper yourself at Lincoln. Catch a flick at Lincoln Square, AMC 84th Street, the Film Society of Lincoln Center or at the newly reincarnated New Plaza Cinema. Channel your inner Tuscan at a sidewalk café while people-gazing over an espresso or amaro. You don’t even have to live there to love the Upper West Side (but let me know if you decide to look!)  
 
Thanks to John Tauranac and his Elegant New York; Wikipedia.org (make a gift when you can!); and 6SqFt.com for all the history.  
  

Robin J Roy, MBA

On the market
One Lincoln Plaza/20 West 64th Street - 33T
My Carnegie Hill colleague, Phyllis Bell, is listing this sparkling one-bedroom condo in an impossibly perfect location in Lincoln Square at an extraordinary price! Across the street from Lincoln Center, down the block to Central Park, steps from the best restaurants, Time Warner and transportation! Imagine yourself in this aerie enjoying your building's plentiful amenities like its fully outfitted gym with sauna and steam room, and its rooftop terrace and year-round pool. Pamper yourself in your pied-a-terre or full-time home, then pop over to the ballet or jump on your bike for a spin in the Park. So many reasons to love this home in the heart of the Upper West Side!

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REITs rose as other stocks fell during trade talks breakdown.
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Legislation to Cut Carbon Emissions Will Cost Property Owners Billions
No good 'leed' goes unpunished: Douglas and Alexander Durst's LEED-platinum building, center, is not green enough for the city's new law.
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Manhattan's supertall glass towers are on their way out with wealthy homebuyers — and classic limestone is in.
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My Manhattan
River To River Festival
Performances and events celebrate artistic and creative diversity in all its forms throughout spaces in Lower Manhattan.
Read More >
NYC Pride March
Out in the streets for the biggest Pride celebration in the world!
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The National Puerto Rican Day Parade
The theme Un Pueblo, Muchas Voces (One Nation, Many Voices) celebrates the creativity and diversity of thought in Puerto Rico and across the diaspora.
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Summer is Better Together
Come together and enjoy various events throughout New York.
See some of the best summer has to offer.

Summer Stage 2019 – Central Park + Various NYC neighborhood parks – Begins June 1st
With nearly 100 free and benefit performances from 200 artists in Central Park and 17 neighborhood parks across New York City.

Celebrate Brooklyn Festival – Prospect Park Bandshell – Begins June 4th
On Tuesday, June 4, BRIC will kick off summer with a celebration of creativity and community, paying special tribute to BRIC Board Chair, Hilary Ackermann at the Opening Night REVEL.

Movie Nights – Bryant Park – Begins June 10th
Bring a blanket and sit on the Lawn to enjoy great food, friends, and a feature film.

Concerts in the Parks – Community Parks throughout all Greater New York Boroughs – Begins June 11th
The New York Philharmonic Concerts in the Parks, Presented by Didi and Oscar Schafer, have become an iconic New York summer experience since they began in 1965.
Robin J Roy, MBA
Robin J Roy, MBA
Lic. as Robin J Roy
Licensed Real Estate Salesperson
(212) 360-2292 (O)  |  (914) 729-4256 (M)
Robin.Roy@corcoran.com
Bio & Listings
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Real estate agents affiliated with The Corcoran Group are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of The Corcoran Group. The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker located at 660 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10065. All material herein is intended for information purposes only and has been compiled from sources deemed reliable. Though information is believed to be correct, it is presented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Equal Housing Opportunity. All dimensions provided are approximate. To obtain exact dimensions, Corcoran advises you to hire a qualified architect or engineer. ©2019 The Corcoran Group. All Rights Reserved.